Sunday, October 30, 2011

Burnt Thumb #2 & memories

Friend: "Have you burnt yourself yet ?"

Me: "No, why do you ask ?"

Friend: "How is your new gas stove ?"

Me: "Fine, still getting used to it"

Well, famous last words. Things break and things have to be replaced and so it was with our old Stove which came with our house when we purchased it back in 1980. It was old then but it worked so we never had an inclination to have it replaced . . . until it broke down again. The hinges on the door were broken which meant that we could not use the oven. The top elements were fine, and so was the broiler section which we use often to broil steaks or roast our own rotisserie chicken.

When it came down to replacement, we wanted what we wanted. We didn't want stainless steel finish, nor did we want Black, nor did we want dual fuel. We just wanted a simple gas stove in white enamel finish to match all the other appliances we have at home. We have a white fridge, white microwave and our small kitchen stuff is white. The dealer finally put one on special order and it took nearly 2 months to get it. Then was the challenged to get it hooked up to our gas line

P1080174

We needed to buy some parts. What you see cost around $122. and we have some pieces left over. It was more expeditious to buy what you think you may need so you don't have to waste time going back to get the 'missing' stuff, which was not returnable. I have never used a gas stove before and it was a learning experience for the first few days, where I burnt my thumb on a very hot pot. Perhaps we have the gas turned on too high as the pots seem to be much hotter than before when we used electric. Now I know what my friend was asking about. We started to put pot holders and oven mitts beside the stove, just in case we need them

On Saturday I decided to make Tomato Beef chow mein, and I burnt my thumb for the second time

P1080199

I boiled a large pot of water, put the burner on High and waited for the pot to boil. Then I added a package of noodles to cook and when it was ready I grabbed the pot handles to pour the cooked noodles into the strainer. All was well at first as the handles are insulated but when the noodles were emptied from the pot, I then grabbed the side of the handle where there was NO insulation. This is where I received burn #2 . Stupid me . . .

I put onions in the skillet, cut strips of beef and when they were nearly cooked, then added the diced tomatoes, then a tbsp of cornstarch and a bit more liquid.

P1080200

Then I turned on the right burner to get the Wok heated up to receive the cooled, cooked noodles. When the noodles were fried up a bit, I added the beef tomato mixture and stirred it up . . . and dinner was served

P1080201

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last Sunday we were down in Tsawwassen and I noticed this Suzuki motorcycle parked in the lot

P1080182

It was a Suzuki GS550L, I bought a new one back in 1980 but mine was wine colour. For some reason you don't see many of these models around. I went over and snapped a few photos, and one of the gauge cluster

P1080183

These were very advanced as compared to their competition. They came with GPI: gear position indicators, electric start. This must have been a later model, as mine also had a kick starter. I also added a Vetter faring with storage pockets, and plastic side cases. Back then I felt "on top of the world" with my new wheels

9 comments:

  1. I really prefer gas stoves but we don't have natural gas available. I guess I could re-jet a stove for propane. There is a big push to build a gas pipeline parallel to the oil pipeline but it's pretty expensive and very political.

    As you observed, pans heat up much faster and you have more control than conventional radiant burners. I hear that induction burners work just as well but they are really expensive and I'd have to replace all of my pans.

    I hope your thumbs heal quickly and your tomato beef looks pretty good.

    Richard

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bob:
    We don't have piped gas on the Peninsula, but our neighbour has big cylinders for cooking and flash water heating which work very well indeed. Too expensive for us to change unfortunately as I like gas.

    There are a lot of the Suzuki GS range still about in NZ too. A real testament to their reliability and they still look great too.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Pretty good burns there Bob, next time though can we have shots of the burn separate from the food port?

    : P

    dom


    Redleg's Rides

    Colorado Motorcycle Travel Examiner

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bob, you need an Ove Glove, maybe two or three!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Owwww on the burned thumbs.

    I've never used a gas cooking stove. When I was a kid (grade 5-6) and living in Princeton we had a gas stove where the burners would turn on all by themselves when you were the only one home.

    Found out later they said the house was haunted. To this day I still refuse to have a gas cooking stove.

    ReplyDelete
  6. RichardM:

    Our gas stove is great, just a learning curve. Heat builds up very fast, nearly instant. Much more control, plus if there is a power failure, we would still be able to cook. That's also why we have a gas insert in the fireplace, for emergencies

    Geoff:

    Suzuki GS's were bulletproof and reliable, except for their stators. Have to make sure your oil level is always full.

    I think a Flash Hot water system would save power as we have to keep our tank heated

    Charlie6:

    my stupidity, should have used the pot holders. I am a slow learner

    David:

    We have oven mitts and pot holders beside the stove as the pots get much hotter than when we had the electric stove. I just never used them

    Trobairitz:

    do you still have family in Princeton ? waiting for you to make a trip up here . . .

    Wow, I don't think I could live in a haunted house, but that's no reason NOT to get a gas stove.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love gas stoves. Only had one for about 4 months at a rental, but we've always considered getting another one. Sorry about the burns. Gas does seem to heat up quickly and get hot fast.

    Fun to see the GS 550 :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Bluekat:

    I love the heat control that gas gives. Yes, the pots and kettle get very hot. I am learning the hard way

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sorry Bobskoot, I have no family left in Canada.

    Troubadour has a brother in Kelowna though.

    ReplyDelete